SOLVING MY PEOPLE PUZZLE

SOLVING MY PEOPLE PUZZLE INSTRUCTIONS
The Solving My People Puzzle assignment provides the student with resources to describe, develop, and manage his/her relational style’s behavioral pressures (e.g., immature & mature ways thinking, feeling, decisioning, and communication patterns) under the influence of a predetermined governing influence (i.e., a guiding purpose statement for being like Christ and becoming more like Him in every relational context; Rice 2005). This governing influence supports meaningful engagement in a student’s interpersonal arena.

• Correct .docx file name – e.g., PACO500_SMPP YourInitials
• Title page
• Table of Contents
• SMPP Project Questions/Answers. Use headings and an annotated outline approach; i.e., bulleted, full-sentence explanations noticeably grounded in required resources through citations/References.
• Conclusion (i.e., the “So What? of it All!”- a recap of this learning activity with a clear, convincing argument for its value in growing in favor with God and others).
• References (at least these 7 sources must be cited;) include these 4 and add 3 more:
? How to Solve the People Puzzle (2008)
? Masterpiece (2017)
? Why Don’t We Listen Better? (2015)
? Case Study – Crossroads: A Story of Forgiveness
• Body of paper double-spaced, typed in 12 pt Times New Roman font, and at least 6 pages. Follow current APA guidelines.

Once assessment information has been collected, integrate that information into the following questions. Place

SMPP Questions:

1. What Guiding Purpose Statement will govern your relationship with God in the midst of every relational context? Integrate the following elements into this two-part response.
• Draft a crisp Guiding Purpose Statement to effectively govern the process of being and becoming like Christ in every relational context. For example, “Seeking to be an imitator of Christ, this student aims to become an attentive husband.”
Pay attention to this TIP: Do not focus on doing a vocational ministry but on being and becoming like Christ in a specific relational context. State it in one concise sentence without any scripture.
• Write a research-based rationale for choosing this Guiding Purpose Statement. Concisely ground the rationale in the readings and Scripture through appropriate citation.

For example, a Fellow-PACOneer stated it this way: “According to Kollar (2011), this student’s relational style cannot be developed and managed until he aligns his thinking with God’s intention (p. 49). According to the Scriptures, it is God’s intention that this believer make every effort to imitate God as Christ demonstrated (i.e., be imitators; Eph. 5:1) so that those on the other side of ‘me’ are influenced toward Christ (i.e., Paul inspired others to imitation; 1 Cor. 11:1) rather than away from Him.”

2. In light of your DISC style, point out how you will shift your style (i.e., find common ground; 1 Cor. 9) to align with each of the four primary styles? Each alignment should give attention to the following:
• Noticeably use language from the readings (e.g., Carbonell, Petersen, Nichols, etc) and assessments that describe relational style patterns (i.e., strengths, shortcomings, immature & mature styles, blindspots: overuse of a strength or an unmanaged shortcoming, communication traps, etc). Be mindful that Graph 2 (This is Me) is a description of your base line “at ease” behavioral patterns. Graph 1 (This is Expected of Me) reveals immature and/or mature behavioral patterns.
• Dig deep and apply several pertinent insights and techniques from each of this assignment’s required sources (7).
• More specifically, apply what you learn as you point out how to shift your particular DISC index to align with each of the DISC behavioral patterns. For example, if your base line style (Graph 2) is DC, how would you shift your DCness in order to align with someone who has a S style? Point out how to shift your style to align with a D, I, S, and C. Responding to this question in a “rich-meaty” fashion will help you satisfactorily answer Questions 3 & 4.
• For the reader’s benefit, include the screen shots of your DISC graphs as an appendix in the paper.

3. Point out how will you communicate and connect with a predetermined care-seeker from the case study?
Your answer will inform a “practice people-helping relationship” in this course’s counseling scenario.
• Choose a care-seeker from case study (i.e., Bruce, Josh, Brody, Melissa, or Justin)
• Make an informed guess and briefly describe care-seeker’s DISC relational style
• Describe at least 1 interpersonal communication technique that will overcome a communication trap and increase your ability to actively listen with empathy, genuineness, and graciousness? As a means to train-in this new approach, secure and support this process with at least 2 helpful insights from pertinent course material and 1 related Scripture.
• Point out how you will shift your relational style to align with your careseeker’s style (i.e., apply Q#1 & 2 insights)
4. Point out how will you communicate and connect with your mentor?
Your answer will inform a “practice mentoring relationship”.
Conclusion: conclude by stating how this information will be used to become more like Christ and interacting with others in a better way.

My DISC PROFILE results:
Introduction of the 4 DISC Personality Types of Behavior
The terms “personality” and “temperament” are synonymous to most people. When we use these terms, we are referring to the predictable patterns of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. There are many theories about personality types. The DISC Model is simple to understand, easy to remember, and practical to apply.
Understanding our active or passive roles (extroverts and introverts) helps us identify our specific temperament styles. By combining these two different categories of influences, along with our task and people-orientations, we end up with four specific types.
Everyone has a predictable pattern of behavior because of his or her specific personality. There are four basic personality types. These types, also known as temperaments, blend together to determine your unique personality. To help you understand why you often feel, think, and act the way you do, review this entire repost.
Our personalities should never become an excuse for poor behavior. The attitude of many is: “That’s just the way I am. Love me or leave me. You knew I was like that when you married me,” but we should not blame our often poor reactions on our personalities.
Each temperament style represents a specific behavior pattern. How we use or abuse our personalities determines our effectiveness with others. Once we understand the four quadrant model of behavior styles, we can begin to identify our individual profile. To simplify the four types of temperaments, we will use William Marston’s DISC titles. The following are the four quadrants of the DISC model:
“D” – active / task-oriented
“I” – active / people-oriented
“S” – passive / people-oriented
“C” – passive / task-oriented
Once you burn these four quadrants in your mind you can begin to easily identify the different personality types. It will also help you become more effective in your work and home. Each personality has its strengths and weaknesses. Conflict or harmony in relationships and job performance are the result of how we use or abuse our personalities in response to life’s situations.
Keep in mind that 85% of people tend to be composites of DISC; therefore, most people will be blends and combinations of the evident characteristics in the four personalities. There are numerous variations of this model. Speakers, writers, and trainers have added their own titles to make the model more simpler or personal, but this four vector explanation of basic human behavior has become very popular. The DISC personality profile (paper instrument) was originally designed by Dr. John Geier and has been validated by the Kaplan Report and Winchester Report. The DISC profile and Model of Human Behavior stands out as one of the most reliable and practical available today.
You have a predictable pattern of behavior because you have a specific personality. There are four basic personality types. These types, also known as temperaments, blend together to determine your unique personality. To help you understand why you often feel, think and act the way you do, review the “Interpretation” page after the Graph 1 and 2 personalized pages in this report. Study the “Pie of DISC Human Behavior” (four quadrant) graphic and page that summarizes the Four Temperament Model of Human Behavior, plus review this entire report for maximum learning.
Interpretation
You have a predictable pattern of behavior because you have a specific personality. There are four basic personality types. These types, also known as temperaments, blend together to determine your unique personality. They help you understand why you often feel, think, and act the way you do. The following graph summarizes the Four Temperament Model of Human Behavior.

Active/Task-oriented “D”
Dominating, Directing, Demanding, Determined, Decisive, Doing
Active/People-oriented “I”
Inspiring, Influencing, Inducing, Impressing, Interactive, Interested in people
Passive/People-oriented “S”
Steady, Stable, Shy, Security-oriented, Servant, Submissive, Specialist
Passive/Task-oriented “C”
Cautious, Competent, Calculating, Compliant, Careful, Contemplative.
“D” Type Behavior
Basic Motivation: Challenge & Control
Desires: Freedom from Control – Authority – Varied Activities – Difficult Assignments – Opportunities for Advancement – Choices rather than ultimatums
Respond Best To Leader Who: Provides direct answers Sticks to task – Gets to the point – Provides pressure – Allows freedom for personal accomplishments
Needs to Learn: You need people – Relaxation is not a crime – Some controls are needed – Everyone has a boss – Self-control is most important – To focus on finishing well is important – Sensitivity to people’s feelings is wise
“I” Type Behavior
Basic Motivation: Recognition & Approval
Desires: Prestige – Friendly relationships – Freedom from details – Opportunities to help others – Opportunities to motivate others – Chance to verbalize ideas
Respond Best To Leader Who: Is fair and is also a friend Provides social involvement – Provides recognition of abilities – Offers rewards for risk-taking
Needs to Learn: Time must be managed – Deadlines are important – Too much optimism can be dangerous – Being responsible is more important than being popular – Listening better will improve one’s influence
“S” Type Behavior
Basic Motivation: Stability & Support
Desires: Area of Specialization – Identification with a group Established work patterns – Security of situation – Consistent and familiar environment(s)
Responds Best To Leader Who: Is relaxed and friendly – Allows time to adjust to changes – Allows to work at own pace – Gives personal support
Needs To Learn: Change provides opportunity – Friendship isn’t everything – Discipline is good – Boldness and taking risks is sometimes necessary
“C” Type Behavior
Basic Motivation: Quality & Correctness
Desires: Clearly defined tasks – Details – Limited risks – Tasks that require precision and planning – Time to think
Responds Best To Leader Who: Provides reassurance Spells out detailed operating procedures – Provides resources to do task correctly – Listens to suggestions
Needs to Learn: Total support is not always possible – Thorough explanation is not everything – Deadlines must be met – More optimism will lead to greater success
Behavioral Blends
These are the Behavioral Blends that are specific to you. Read through the report to see other personalized information. At the bottom of each page is a link to pages with general information.
This is expected of me: INSPIRATIONAL COMPETENT (I/C)
This is me: DOMINANT INSPIRING CAUTIOUS (D/I/C)
Preface: This section is designed to describe specific personality types from a public perspective – when individuals are either in their work environments or in settings away from their homes or comfort zones. People tend to have different motivations in public – at work or away from where they live than they have in private – at home or in familiar environments.
Review the following insights with a specific person in mind, or find the type that describes your specific Graph 1 personality type.

Your Personality Type on Graph 1: “This is expected of me!”

Description
As an “I / C” or “C / I” type, you think people expect you to be both inspiring and competent. You make one of the best public speaker types because you can talk with enthusiasm and knowledge. You feel that people want you to be an influential and informative communicator. You tend to be more excited and keep people’s interest better than others, and you prepare and study so that you have great material when you speak. You tend to have good substance and sizzle when you address groups. You also think people expect you to research and dig deeper into problems than most. On one hand, you tend to be more cautious and calculating. On the other hand, you can also be optimistic and free spirited. You don’t think people want you to be dominant or demanding, but neither do they want you to be submissive or shy.
How Others See You
Others view you as an influencer with great wisdom. Cautious and careful types are often considered wise because they consider the consequences before proceeding. You often wait and see, and then you act. However, there is also a side of you that likes to take risks. You think people expect you to be a dichotomy or strange bedfellow. People see you from two different perspectives. You are active and passive, and you are task and people oriented. You aren’t seen as abrasive or pushy unless people try to get you to do things that don’t make sense. You aren’t seen as one who is sweet and sensitive. You tend to be seen as one who is interested in lots of people and one who follows the rules.
Your Feelings and Thinking
You tend to often feel both optimistic and pessimistic. This is not abnormal. You simply struggle between having a positive and negative attitude. Like a comedian once said, “Sometimes you feel like a nut and sometimes you don’t.” In other words, you can be spontaneous and respond at a moment’s notice or you can be very slow to act because you are also very cautious. You think people want you to be both because it makes sense, and life is sometimes short. You don’t want to miss anything exciting and you don’t want to do anything stupid. You don’t feel like doing things because of a challenge or not doing things because of insecurity.
Vision and Passion
You often see through bifocals. One lens is optimistic and exciting, while the other is realistic and deep. Your passion tends to be your ability to influence and impress people with your articulation and information. You think people want you to see situations more clearly than others. Therefore, you dig deeper and research more than necessary. Your passion is often a mix of talking and impressing others, as well as researching and finding facts that others don’t know. You are not motivated to see things from a control perspective or a serving orientation.
Leadership Style
Your leadership style is more inspiring and contemplative. You tend to lead with your words and mind. You are not all talk. Nor are you all facts. You think people want you to lead through your verbal skills and with the research and information you gather. You sometimes have problems with those who want you to be stronger and more challenging. You also may have problems with those who want you to be more sensitive and touchy-feely. You don’t tend to like people who give ultimatums. You also don’t care for timid and fearful types who never seem to do anything.
Follower Style
You sometimes have a problem following because people seem to look up to you and often want you to be the leader. You don’t tend to be in charge because you are not dominating or demanding. You are more of an educated cheerleader who encourages others through information. You think people want you to be inducing and educating. You don’t have to be in charge, but you need leaders who allow you to express your feelings and who encourage you to dig deeper to uncover more information.
Responds Best To
You seem to respond best to those who are both active and comfortable with crowds, and to those who are task and research oriented like you. You think people want you to respond to the crowd’s need for influence and information. You don’t tend to respond well to those who are too direct and defiant. You also don’t tend to respond well to those who are quiet, shy, and dull. You like to inspire and be inspired, and you also enjoy digging deep into a subject and discovering or discerning facts that others may not know.
Conflict Management
You think people want you to avoid conflicts by influencing others to be happy and educated. You also feel that others want you to diffuse problems with accurate and convincing information. You don’t like arguing over control or having to tiptoe around people’s emotions. You like presenting the facts in an inspiring and impressive way such that people make decisions based on the information you have uncovered. You tend to be a good diplomat who represents your side with optimism and convincing facts. You don’t think people expect you to argue over who has the right to decide, but rather who has the most convincing argument. You can be a little stubborn when presenting your side, and you need to remember that your inspirational communication can be more powerful than your know-it-all attitude.
Strengths and Uniquenesses
You are strongest in the area of speaking and thinking skills. You don’t think people expect you to be aggressive or assertive. Nor do you think that people expect you to be submissive and shy. You are one of the best at making great impressions with the combination of your enthusiasm and intellectual abilities. Your uniqueness, or what others may call your “weakness”, can be either your lack of drive when things need to get done or your servant’s attitude when you have to work by yourself.
Overuses and Abuses
You sometimes overuse your charisma to manipulate people. You think others expect you to be overly friendly. You have a way of influencing others with your charm and knowledge. You seem to know a lot about different things because you like to research and investigate information. This often makes people expect you to be expressive. This is especially true in groups, which causes you to think critically and be faultfinding. Don’t take advantage of your popularity and knowledge to talk people into believing things that perhaps they shouldn’t believe.
Guard Against & Warnings
You sometimes become caustic and say hurtful comments in the heat of the moment. You need to control your words and occasional judgmental attitude. People seem to trust you because of your competence and compliance. They believe that you prefer to do things the right way and that you try to abide by the rules or go by the book. You probably have reminded or convinced them of this commendable attribute, but you may sometimes use it for selfish gain. Have more will power and don’t let your pride destroy your character. Be more sensitive to the needs of individuals as opposed to your selfish gain.
Relating Style
You relate well to those who need inspiration that is supported by information. You think people expect you to lift them up as part of a group, while convincing them with facts. You don’t relate well to those who need scolding or rebuking. You also tend not to communicate as well with those who are emotionally weak and need an authority figure or close friend. You seem to feel that people want you to be an articulate and knowledgeable communicator.
Conclusion
You tend to have the best reputation and admirers of all the types because of your ability to impress a crowd with your words and wisdom. People like to listen to you when you have prepared and present the facts with emotions. You are the ultimate crowd pleaser. You think people want you to be inspiring and popular with crowds, as well as studious and deep with your presentations. You don’t tend to be very aggressive or demanding, and you aren’t shy or security-oriented. In other words, you don’t need a lot of security because you are more popular than most, and you seem to have more answers than others.
DISCLAIMER: These insights are broad descriptions of your specific personality type. They are NOT intended to be 100% accurate. This is simply a brief overview.
Having completed your Uniquely You Personality Questionnaire, be sure to view these descriptions from a Graph 1: “This is expected of me” perspective. If both graphs are the same, your understanding of them will be easier. If both graphs are different, keep the appropriate perspective in mind and interpret the descriptions accordingly.
People seem to respond and behave from different perspectives and drives. This profile is purely subjective, based on the DISC Model of Human Behavior Science, and applies to your more guarded, masked, or controlled behavior, especially in public. Review the insights with your specific personality type in mind, but do not conclude that you are always characterized by these descriptions.
This is simply how you tend to behave when you think others are watching, and you want to make good impressions. Your interpretation of this information should take into account your environment, maturity, spirituality, and experiences.
This is NOT a psychological evaluation and is not intended to be used as a definitive example of your behavior.
Preface: This section is designed to describe specific personality types from a private perspective – when individuals are either in their home environments or in settings among friends and relatives. People tend to have different motivations in public – at home or away from work than they have in public – at work or among casual friends or strangers.
Review the following insights with a specific person in mind, or find the type that describes your specific Graph 2 personality type.
Your Personality Type on Graph 2: “This is me!”

Description
As a high “D / I / C”, or “D / C / I”, or “I / C / D”, or “I / D / C”, or “C / I / D”, or “C / D / I” personality type, you are dominant, inspiring, and cautious. You are active in your task-orientation and can handle pressure well, but you are also passive in your task-orientation; you like to research and investigate the facts as well as fulfill your dreams. You are also active in your people orientation and communicate well in public. You aren’t very sensitive in private, and you prefer larger groups to small groups or individuals. You don’t tend to be sweet, soft, or submissive. You prefer to tackle a difficult task after preparing and organizing your plan. You also prefer to inspire people to help you fulfill your mission. You are goal-oriented with specific steps of action, and you have the ability to communicate your thoughts and conclusions. This causes people to have the confidence and enthusiasm to help you.
How Others See You
People often see you in several different ways. Some see you as confident and determined, while others notice your ability to communicate and inspire others. Others recognize your thinking and analytical skills. You have varied motivations which enhance your reputation to lead, influence, and research the difficult challenges of life. You aren’t looked upon as weak or sensitive. You are tough and mobile. You like to reach and teach the masses with your enthusiasm and knowledge. You are seen as intellectually wise and emotionally positive. You can be a little too critical or fault finding, but people generally see you as optimistic.
Your Feelings and Thinking
You often feel good about yourself and can sometimes become a bit too confident. Your realistic and cautious side keeps your feet on the ground. You often seem to think you know best about what to do and how to do it. Your attitude is usually more positive than negative, but you can become overwhelmed by seemingly unsolvable problems. You can be a little hard on yourself and others. You feel frustrated when things are not planned or done right. You want to fix problems, and you have a way with your words that inspires others to let you take charge. You sometimes think or ponder problems too much. You sometimes decide to move forward not investigating enough. You often have a serious wrestling match between your positive and negative thinking.
Vision and Passion
Your vision is often focused on accomplishing tasks through influencing others and developing detailed plans to succeed. Your passion is to win over others and move forward with as many people as you can possibly educate and persuade with the facts. You don’t like looking through foggy glasses. You seek clear answers that convince the greatest skeptics. Your passion is gathering information and then making decisions to proceed with as large a crowd as you can convince and can mobilize.
Leadership Style
Your leadership style consists of several different influences. You are an enthusiastic leader with serious task skills. You like to influence and be involved with people, but you are also active and passive task-oriented. In other words, you can be both forward and demanding, as well as withdraw when a task needs to be completed. Once convinced of what you should do and how to do it in the best way possible, you are a great sales person and cheerleader. You need to be more sensitive to those who seek steady, stable, and secure environments. You should slow down, as most people tend to be more passive and need time to accept and adjust to your leadership.
Follower Style
You sometimes struggle if you have to follow others because you have such strong desires to dominate, inspire, and correct. You don’t seem to have the patience or need for people to lead you. You can be a little too independent and aggressive. You also see things more clearly than others. At times, nevertheless, you may need to follow someone’s directions. You often feel your way is best. You can be a good follower when you really trust, respect, and admire your leaders.
Responds Best To
You respond best to challenging and exciting opportunities which allow you to study and research before moving forward. You often get nervous when people try to get you to follow them blindly. You like it when people trust your confidence enough to take risks and also allow you to prepare. Your optimism and positive attitude are motivating when you share openly. During those times, people get excited about your plans.
Conflict Management
You seem to handle conflict well because you aren’t sensitive to everyone’s feelings. You handle challenges directly and aren’t afraid of standing up for what you believe. You are often studious and knowledgeable about details. You seem to communicate better than most and articulate your thoughts well. People seem to respond to your concerns and influence more than they do to others. You seem to fall short with individuals who aren’t as confident as you. They sometimes think you don’t have feelings or patience. You often exhibit great enthusiasm with crowds, but seem to lack warmth with individuals. Step back and work on building more secure and steady relationships with individuals.
Strengths and Uniquenesses
Your strengths are numerous. You are very strong-willed, energetic, and contemplative. You like to get the job done, and you strive to do it correctly. You also inspire and impress people with your communication skills, but sometimes fall short in showing sensitivity to individuals. You don’t need much assurance and sometimes come across as uncaring. Your uniqueness, or what others may see as your weakness, is that you can be too strong, proud, or a know-it-all. You can be opinionated and loud, although you often come across as outwardly friendly. Some people think you are self-centered, but they respect your ability to take on challenges, gather those around you to act, and perfect the details.
Overuses and Abuses
You sometimes overuse your drives to work hard and talk. You can be insensitive to seemingly insignificant people, while acting friendly to very important people. You may emotionally abuse others because of your task-orientation. In other words, you may be assertive and picky about getting jobs finished. You may not be as patient as you should. Sometimes, you may talk too much and not listen. You can be too hard on those who seem weak or need close relationships. Be softer and slower with those who don’t respond like you think they ought to respond.
Guard Against & Warnings
You can be your own worst enemy because you have several great qualities. Your greatest challenge can be your seeming lack of warmth and kindness. People see you as strong and sure, but not soft and sweet. Don’t be as forward and demanding or as cautious and complaining. Let your inspiring and influential nature overshadow your task tendencies. Come down to the lower levels and humbly serve those who seem weaker. Your are strongest when you are weakest and show humility, quietness, and kindness.
Relating Style
You relate best to those who like power, confidence, competence, and enthusiasm. You don’t relate well to the more gentle and soft types. They seem to be overly nice and kind. You often wish they would take a stand and speak their minds. As there are more of the passive people-oriented types than the others, you tend not to relate well to the masses. Nevertheless, people look up to you and often want to be close to you because of your confidence. You bring security and stability into their lives. At times, you need people to look up to you so that you can tell them what to do and how to do it, which can lead to codependency.
Conclusion
You have tremendous qualities that seem to stand out. You prefer to be more active than passive, but also have a contemplative and moody side. You are comfortable deciding and demanding, as well as planning and preparing. You express yourself well and are outgoing. You are not shy or submissive. You seek to comply with the rules, but you sometimes challenge the status quo. You like to be your own boss, but don’t mind following those who know more than you. You have an entrepreneurial spirit, and you desire to move forward cautiously. You can entertain and express yourself well. You shine best in the limelight. Your most neglected needs are slowing down, making unresearched decisions, and letting others talk more than you. You have a lot of great qualities.
DISCLAIMER: These insights are broad descriptions of your specific personality type. They are NOT intended to be 100% accurate. This is simply a brief overview.
Having completed your Uniquely You Personality Questionnaire, be sure to view these descriptions from a Graph 2: “This is me” perspective. If both graphs are the same, your understanding of them will be easier. If both graphs are different, keep the appropriate perspective in mind and interpret the descriptions accordingly.
People seem to respond and behave from different perspectives and drives. This profile is purely subjective, based on the DISC Model of Human Behavior Science, and applies to your more unguarded, unmasked, and accentuate type of behavior, especially among close friends or relatives. Review the insights with your specific personality type in mind, but do not conclude that you are always characterized by these descriptions.
This is simply how you tend to behave when your true feelings are evident or come out under stress. Your interpretation of this information should take into account your environment, maturity, spirituality, and experiences.
This is NOT a psychological evaluation and is not intended to be used as a definitive example of your behavior.
When Both Graphs 1 & 2 Are Generally Different
Your Uniquely You Personality Profile contains basic insights on how you tend to think, feel, and act from a DISC temperament type perspective. If your graphs are generally different, you are simply revealing something contrasting about your behavior. You may be saying that you think people want you to behave one way in public, but you sometimes feel you should respond in a different way in private. In other words, if you have a specific high type in Graph 1 and the same type low in Graph 2, you believe that people expect you to be one way in public, but not that way in private.
You may also be revealing that you feel that people expect you to behave one way among fellow employees and associates at work or publicly outside your more personal and familiar environments (Graph 1), than you tend to behave either at home under pressure among your closest friends and relatives or in more familiar environments (Graph 2). Keep in mind that Graph 1 is the behavior “expected of you” when you have your guard up and mask on (usually your place of employment or in casual environments). Graph 2 is “the real you” when you let your hair down, drop your guard, or take your mask off (usually at home or among those you know best in more familiar environments).
When both graphs are different, you are either struggling with your motivations and feelings or you are aware of your challenges and perhaps handling them well. Having a different configuration in your two graphs is common and can be very enlightening. It may be a sign that you are mature and capable of controlling your inner feelings and natural thoughts. Or, it can mean that you are not even aware of the struggles within you.
Understanding and adjusting your thoughts, feelings, and actions using these insights can be very productive and wise. Review and study your two graphs, keeping in mind the similarities and differences. Then, learn how to control your motivations rather than letting them control you.
Your LOW “D” on Graph 1 and HIGH “D” on Graph 2
You have a Low “D” on Graph 1 and a High “D” on Graph 2. This may mean that you have your dominant and demanding personality under control or you are suppressing it. Either way, it could be to your advantage to be less aggressive and assertive than you seem to really be.
The degree to which you are controlling your personality is shown by how high or low your “D” is on Graphs 1 or 2 In other words, if your “D” is closer to the bottom of your graph, you will be less determined and demanding than if your “D” is closer to or higher than the midline. If your “D” is just below the midline, you will be a little less controlling, but not as much as when your “D” is higher than the midline. The lower your “D,” the less intense and driven you tend to be.
When your “expected of you” behavior (Graph 1) is less controlling and driving, you won’t act in public like you tend to be in private. At home, or among friends and relatives, you can be too strong and hard on them. If you have a Low “D” in Graph 1, you feel that people don’t want you to be as forward and confident as you really are.
It can be a good sign that you tend to control yourself more in public, but this may also mean that you need to be more sensitive in private. You could have a lot of pressure at work which causes you to wisely guard your tendency to be too aggressive and potentially explosive. Let whatever is causing you to be less dominant at work or in public control you to be more gentle at home or in familiar environments.
Also, you may need to be as direct and decisive at work or in public as you can be in private. You have the confidence to be bold and self-disciplined, but for some reason, you back off in public or at work. This can be a good trait privately, but you may be suppressing it.
Don’t let your feelings get out of control. Guard your will power. Be more aware of your feelings and actions both in public and privately. Notice your tendency to shy away from taking charge at work or in unfamiliar environments. You can be too cautious or too concerned of what others might think. At work, you often suppress or control your natural drive to make things happen like you do at home. Just guard your emotions and need to achieve so that you don’t overdo it where ever you are.
In summary, your low “D” in Graph 1 and high “D” in Graph 2 means you can adapt and tend to be more in control of yourself publicly than privately. Also, you are often more transparent and predictably bossy when you are under pressure in private, especially at home, or among friends and relatives.
Case Study or Example of an Immature or Out-Of-Control “C/I” Type
Imagine an “I/C” or “C/I” personality who is obviously immature or out of control. He is a great presenter and public speaker. He keeps his audiences Interested;his information is always deep and informational.
His problem now is that he has become too proud of his abilities and lacks the aggressiveness to try new things. He is also not very sensitive to other people’s feelings. He stands out in a crowd and is admired for what he knows, but he seems to be a little “cocky” and too sure of himself.
He seems to get away with his arrogance and egotistical sharp tongue, but people have grown tired of his “know-it-all” attitude. He often interrupts conversations and seems to always have a better idea or more accurate information.
He can be very positive, then turn right around and be extremely negative. He seems to be up one minute and down the next. People never know what mood they are going to catch him in. He tends to be very unpredictable.
This “I/C” or C/I” type is consistently inconsistent. He seems to be on then off, talkative then contemplative, outgoing then reserved and friendly then rude. His immaturity and out of control behavior is ruining his relationships and effectiveness.
He desperately needs to be more determined to control his tongue and attitudes. He should focus on being more productive and kind. He needs to learn more humility and teamwork. He tends to work well with people, but often manipulates them into doing what he wants.
His ability to influence and impress people has been polluted by his achievements and pride. He knows that he often stands out in a crowd and that people admire his knowledge. That is his biggest pitfall.
He needs to control himself and seek to make others look better. He also lacks drive and determination when it comes to completing tasks. He can get easily distracted and frustrated changing from one impulse to another.
He often suffers from the paralysis of analysis and takes much too long to complete his projects. He sometimes sets them aside or postpones his work so he can talk to someone or have more fun. He needs to be more decisive and determined.
He also lacks sensitivity and compassion. He doesn’t show much empathy for others. His critical spirit and fault finding attitude often offends others. He doesn’t seem to be very caring or kind.
This “I/C” 0r “C/I” should recognize how much more effective he would be with a little more softness and sweetness. He may put on a good show in front of the crowd, but individually, people see right through him.
He will be admired, rather than criticized once he learns to improve in his passive people-skills (S) and his active task-skills (D). He desperately needs to learn how to be a “man of steel and velvet.

Case Study or Example of an Mature or In-Control “C/I” Type
Here’s an example of an “I/C” or “C/I” who is very mature and in control of her personality. She has learned how to guard her strengths and avoid her uniquenesses (weaknesses). Everyone says she’s a “sharp cookie.”
She seems to outshine everyone through her cordial and friendly ways. She is a super communicator. She is articulate and knowledgeable of so many things. What she doesn’t know, she researches and investigates until she feels confident sharing her knowledge.
Though not very forward or demanding, she has learned to take charge and be more assertive. She also has a soft spot and often demonstrates a servant’s heart. She seems more comfortable in a crowd, but is just as motivated to seclude herself in study and research.
She can be humorous and serious. Sometimes she lets her hair down and acts like a clown. She can be a drama queen and entertain the multitudes. People are amazed by her way with words and storytelling. She makes illustrations come alive.
She also seems to be very deep and sometimes absorbed in her thoughts. She is highly recognized for her enthusiastic personality, but is also respected for her competent and thorough thought processes. She can talk without thinking, but seems to say the right things as though she has been thinking about them forever.
Even her dominating and demanding ways seem tempered with patience. She has learned not to be controlled by stronger types, but to use her communication skills to defuse anger or aggression. She is a great negotiator. She seems to know exactly what to say and when to say it.
Her sweet and soft side is also evident when faced with the need to show mercy and grace. Though often hard on others for their wrongdoing, she can back off and be kind and caring. She seems to have the right balance that makes her a very desirable team member and leader.
She doesn’t seek attention like most of those who have “I” personalities. She also isn’t a perfectionist like most “C” types. She seems to be the best of all four types because she has matured and is in control of her feelings, thoughts, and actions.
It is rare to find someone who can handle their natural motivations and drives. As an “I/C” or “C/I” she seems to float in and out of situations with the wisdom of a sage and the beauty of a butterfly. Perhaps her best descriptions are that she has the determination of a conqueror, the influence of a leader, the silence of a dear friend, and the competence of a wise judge.
Case Study or Example of an Immature or Out-Of-Control “D/I/C” Type
I’m thinking of a “D / I / C” or “D / C / I” or “I / D / C” or “I / C / D” or “C / D / I” or “C / I / D” type who is overly dominant, egotistical, and critical. He is also not submissive or kind. He seems to have all the bad characteristics of each personality type, but it is not the fault of his personality.
Actually there is no problem with this type. The difficulty is with how he controls his feelings, thoughts, and actions. Each of his individual traits are good, but since he doesn’t guard them, they have become liabilities, rather than assets.
His direct and decisive drives have turned into domineering and dividing forces. His influencing and impressing ways are now obnoxious and self-centered behaviors. His calculating and conscientious thinking have become critical and fault finding bad attitudes.
His lack of submissive and sensitive feelings make him hard to tolerate. He sometimes is not very popular or respected because he seems to exhibit the worst part of all four personality types. He is doomed to a life of misery and destruction because of his indifference and lack of discipline.
He has the potential of being a great leader because of so many good possibilities. He has all that he needs intrinsically, but his decisions have betrayed him. He has chosen to not control his feelings, thoughts, and actions. He now suffers the consequences of his own decisions.
Instead of controlling his driving and demanding personality type, he allowed it to control him and now becomes angry and explosive when confronted. Instead of guarding his natural outgoing and friendly traits, he has become loud and crude. People often don’t like his outrageous behavior. Instead of being competent and cautious, he has become haughty and argumentative.
His secure and stable attitude has also become seemingly insecure and unsteady. He constantly needs reassurance and attention. Everything about him has become exaggerated and unreasonable. He has so many potentially good characteristics, but his immaturity has short-circuited his decision making.
Almost everything he does seems to be an overreaction or an overemphasis of a good thing, which in turn becomes a bad thing. If he would only guard his strengths and turn his weaknesses around opposite to what he feels like doing, he would be much more effective and successful. He needs to control the way he responds in life, rather than allowing the stresses and pressures of life to control his personality.
Case Study or Example of an Mature or In Control “D/I/C” Type
There is a “D / I / C” or “D / C / I” or “I / D / C” or “I / C / D” or “C / D / I” or “C / I / D” type lady who is one of the classiest ladies around. She is not a weak and helpless person who people try to intimidate. She is also not boring or so quiet no one knows she is around. Neither is she an opinionated know-it-all.
She seems to be very direct and demanding, while considerate and cordial. She also tends to be more outgoing and impressing, while humble and gracious. She can even be conscientious and thorough, while being understanding and flexible.
She is admired by all because she has so many mature traits. Even her natural lack of submission is overshadowed by her willingness to cooperate. She is capable of turning on a dime and fitting anywhere necessary.
Her greatest ability is flexibility. Adapting to the demands and pressures of life is so hard for most people, but this lady has mastered her feelings, thoughts, and actions.
Having three of the behavioral traits predominant in one’s personality is a blessing or a challenge. On one hand, this lady is multimotivated from several different influences and drives. She doesn’t seem to care that much about being sweet and sensitive, but doesn’t let that lack in her demeanor control her. She has, on the other hand, learned to subdue it.
Being all things to all people is very rare. Most people seem to lean toward two specific personality styles. 85% of people have two or three behavioral blends motivating them. Since most people are not able to control their personalities’ influences, they miss being as effective as they could be.
The key is understanding and recognizing where our drives usually come from. Normally most of what we feel, think, and do starts with how we are behaviorally wired. We then act upon those influences in a responsible or irresponsible way. The bottom line for success and effectiveness is decision making.
This lady has developed a habit of making the right decisions when challenged. She has learned to be more determined to control herself rather than others. She also guards her desires to stand out in a crowd and watches what she says or does so she is seen as a team player.
She tends to struggle between opposite behaviors — speaking before thinking and organizing too much before doing anything. She allows her decisiveness to control her correctness, plus her contemplation to control her communication and visa-versa.
This is easier said than done, but mastering it has become her greatest asset.
Graph 1: “This is expected of me”
“This is expected of me” is your response to how you think people expect you to behave. It’s your normal guarded and masked behavior.
Description: As an “I / C” or “C / I” type, you think people expect you to be both inspiring and competent. You make one of the best public speaker types because you can talk with enthusiasm and knowledge. You feel that people want you to be an influential and informative communicator. You tend to be more excited and keep people’s interest better than others, and you prepare and study so that you have great material when you speak. You tend to have good substance and sizzle when you address groups. You also think people expect you to research and dig deeper into problems than most. On one hand, you tend to be more cautious and calculating. On the other hand, you can also be optimistic and free spirited. You don’t think people want you to be dominant or demanding, but neither do they want you to be submissive or shy.
I/C – INSPIRATIONAL COMPETENT
Discovering your behavioral blends
“I/C” Types are inspiring, yet cautious. They size up situations and comply with the rules in order to look good. They are good at figuring out ways to do things better through a lot of people. They can be too persuasive and too concerned about winning. They are often impatient and critical. They need to be more sensitive to individual feelings. They are often more concerned about what others think. They do not like breaking the rules; neither do they enjoy taking risks. They need to try new things and sometimes go against the crowd. They are careful communicators who think things through.
Controlling your behavioral blends

• Don’t think too highly of yourself.
• Be a good example.
• Care more about insignificant people.
• Be bold and confident.
• Guard what you say.
• Don’t flatter yourself.
Graph 2: “This is me”
“This is me” is your response to how you feel and think under pressure – how you really feel and think inside. It’s your normal unguarded and unmasked behavior.
Description: As a high “D / I / C”, or “D / C / I”, or “I / C / D”, or “I / D / C”, or “C / I / D”, or “C / D / I” personality type, you are dominant, inspiring, and cautious. You are active in your task-orientation and can handle pressure well, but you are also passive in your task-orientation; you like to research and investigate the facts as well as fulfill your dreams. You are also active in your people orientation and communicate well in public. You aren’t very sensitive in private, and you prefer larger groups to small groups or individuals. You don’t tend to be sweet, soft, or submissive. You prefer to tackle a difficult task after preparing and organizing your plan. You also prefer to inspire people to help you fulfill your mission. You are goal-oriented with specific steps of action, and you have the ability to communicate your thoughts and conclusions. This causes people to have the confidence and enthusiasm to help you.
D/I/C – DOMINANT INSPIRING CAUTIOUS
Discovering your behavioral blends
“D/I/C’s” are demanding, impressing and competent. They tend to be more task-oriented, but can be people-oriented before crowds. They need to increase their sensitivity and softness. They don’t mind change. Active and outgoing, they are also compliant and cautious. They like to do things correctly, while driving and influencing others to follow. Their verbal skills combined with their determination and competence to achieve. Security is not as important as accomplishment and looking good.
Controlling your behavioral blends

• Listen more.
• Be more sensitive to other’s feelings.
• Be a peacemaker.
• Do not be judgmental.
• Be optimistic and encouraging to others.
Your DISC Insights
William tends to be more: William tends to be less:
Kind / Nice / Caring Proper / Formal
Law-abiding / Conscientious Gentle / Soft / Humble
Calculating / Analytical Loyal / True Blue
Convinced / Cocky Peaceful / Calm
Friendly / Cordial / Popular Careful / Cautious
Promoting / Encouraging Pleasing / Good-natured
Forceful / Strong-willed Perfectionist / Precise
Enthusiastic / Influencing Contented / Satisfied
Loving / Sincere / Honest Persistent / Restless / Relentless
Positive / Optimistic Shy / Mild
Contemplative / Thinker Admirable / Elegant
Ambitious / Goes for it Deep / Intense
Challenging / Motivating Accurate / Exact
Animated / Expressive Confident / Self-reliant
Persuading / Convincing Controlling / Taking charge
Sociable / Interactive Guarded / Masked / Protective
Generous / Giving Preparing / Researching
Industrious / Hard working Timid / Soft-spoken
Inquisitive / Questioning Dynamic / Impressing
Serving / Sacrificing Direct / To the point
Devoted / Dedicated Strict / Unbending
Hospitable / Enjoys company Outspoken / Opinionated
Organized / Orderly Quiet / Reserved
Helpful / Assisting Bottom line / Straight-forward
William’s “D”Tendencies seem to be:
Convinced, Cocky, Forceful, Strong-willed, Positive, Optimistic, Ambitious, Goes for it, Challenging, Motivating, Industrious, Hard working
William’s “I”Tendencies seem to be:
Friendly, Cordial, Popular, Promoting, Encouraging, Animated, Expressive, Persuading, Convincing, Sociable, Interactive
William’s “S”Tendencies seem to be:
Kind, Nice, Caring, Generous, Giving, Hospitable, Enjoys company, Helpful, Assisting
William’s “C”Tendencies seem to be:
Law-abiding, Conscientious, Calculating, Analytical, Contemplative, Thinker, Inquisitive, Questioning, Organized, Orderly
William’s “D”Tendencies are not very:
Persistent, Restless, Relentless, Controlling, Taking charge, Direct, To the point, Outspoken, Opinionated, Bottom line, Straight-forward
William’s “I”Tendencies are not very:
Dynamic, Impressing
William’s “S”Tendencies are not very:
Gentle, Soft, Humble, Loyal, True Blue, Peaceful, Calm, Pleasing, Good-natured, Contented, Satisfied, Shy, Mild, Timid, Soft-spoken
William’s “C”Tendencies are not very:
Proper, Formal, Careful, Cautious, Perfectionist, Precise, Preparing, Researching

The Example to Follow:

Solving My People Puzzle
The purpose of this paper will be to analyze my particular personality profile in relation to other prominent personalities. The intention of this assessment will be done in a form and fashion that will prepare me to be able to communicate positively. Petersen (2015) explains that “underneath the words are attitudes and ways of treating people that make a difference” (p. 165).
Question #1: Guiding Purpose Statement
Nichols (2017) describes differing approaches to relationships based upon the security of a person’s self-image. It is only with a secure self-image that a person can enter a relationship that seeks to invest or build up the other person. A secure self-image is found through understanding more of the masterpiece that God is developing in me, “to be conformed to the image of [God’s] son” (Rom. 8:31). In sum, my current GPS draft follows: Seeking to be an example of Christ, I am committed to become an attentive friend. In some instances with stronger personalities, I may need to ratchet up attentiveness to assertiveness.
Question #2: DISC Style Alignment
After completing the Uniquely You DISC assessment (2018), I received a report of a C/I/S personality type. This assessment proved to be significantly accurate as I read through the report describing my tendencies in different roles, situations and views. Knowing the accuracy of this report in determining my tendencies enables me to more fully embrace and trust the system’s ability to analyze other people. The below reflect my takeaways on how my personality type can find common ground with the four major personality types.
Active/Task-oriented “D”
Relating to a “D” personality type when I am in a leadership position will require me to be more directing than I am comfortable with. The “D” personality responds best to a direct challenge rather than my tendency to allow people under my leadership to pick and choose what they would like to accomplish. My personality profile will work well with the “D” who is in leadership. I tend to do what I am told, and the “D” likes to tell people what to do. I will need to be more assertive with the “D”. If I am not mindful, I will be pushed around by the “D” personality. I need to strive to “increase [my] strength to resist those who want to control [me]. Learn how to say ‘no’ even when people may be right but are threatening [me] in wrong ways” (Uniquely You Report, 2018, p. 9). I must be aware of my own confidence levels as I tend to feel intimidated by the strong will “D” personality. I will need to focus greatly on my posture. As Peterson (2015) puts it, “Straighten up physically and grow into it emotionally” (p. 43).
Active/People-oriented “I”
The “I” personality likes to connect to people through stories. One of the greatest ways that I can find common ground with an “I” personality is by focusing more on the stories that they share in response to what I am saying. I can remain open to understanding the “I” personality even when they express emotionally charged or exaggerated responses. If I am in a leadership position over an “I” or in a counseling situation with an “I”, I will be intentional to give praise and recognition for their accomplishments (Carbonell, 2008).
Passive/People-oriented “S”
To obtain a relationship that is meaningful and uplifting to the “S” personality, I must express my belief in their value and abilities without being pushy (Carbonell, 2008). I must be ever aware and cautious that I can “abuse people’s trust in [me] by taking advantage of those who can be manipulated” (Uniquely You Report, 2018, p. 9). The “S” personality is more sensitive and submissive. For me to relate positively requires that my more extraverted nature be kept within check, so I do not overwhelm and overpower the “S”. As a person who seeks to encourage and inspire, I must learn to do so in a way that does not put the “S” on the spot to speak in front of a group. Careful attention must be paid to encourage and recognize the “S” as they often go unnoticed (Carbonell, 2008).
Passive/Task-oriented “C”
The “C” personality is one in which I noticeably struggle to positively engage. In my former occupation I was a team leader in an insurance underwriting department. One of the underwriters that I oversaw was a strong “C” personality. The task often took precedence over her colleague relationships which gave many of her coworkers the feeling that she was angry and unapproachable. I have learned and continue to find common ground in my and the “C” personality’s mutual desire for compliance to truth. I will seek to build up the “C” personality by acknowledging and appreciating the dedication to accuracy. My desire for relationship and the “C” personality’s need to consider relationships more can be mutually beneficial as I can achieve relationship while helping the “C” to pursue relationship in the midst of tasks (Carbonell, 2008).
To find common ground with a variety of people requires me to be a human chameleon. Like a chameleon, I am changing based upon the environment, but I am not changing who I am. I look forward to the opportunities to build others up through meaningful relationships.
Question #3: Care-Seeker Connection
Brody, age 15, is the second son of Bruce and Cindy. Brody is described as someone who “relies heavily on those closest to him for approval or acceptance” (Rice, 2018, p. 5). Brody resembles a strong “S” personality type. He receives a lot of his confidence and self-worth from the close relationship, encouragement and support that he receives from his family, primarily his mother and sister. Brody relates well with those who spend time taking interest and supporting him in his interests and abilities. He does not do well with relationships where the other person is overbearing and demanding.
When seeking to counsel or help Brody, it will be important that I avoid Petersen’s (2015) ninth common communication trap, fixing it. Fixing it is described as taking away confidence from the talker. With Brody’s personality profile, such a blow to his confidence would seriously encumber our counselor-counselee relationship. Instead of seeking to solve Brody’s problem, I will be intentional to alternate feelings and thoughts in my responses to him. By asking responsive questions that switch his brain from feeling to thought and back again, I will be appropriately engaged to help Brody own his problem and he will be able to avoid the traps of depression and anger. This is supported by taking into consideration that the counselee is always changing. “For everything there is a season, and a time for every matter under heaven” (Ecc. 3:1, The English Standard Version). With this in mind, it will help me to alternate Brody’s feelings and thoughts to ensure that he is never dwelling to long in a negative state of anger or depression. In so doing, this will help me focus on how the change in Brody will occur more than spending time and effort trying to figure out when the change will occur (Kollar, 2011).
I must seek to be supportive and encouraging with Brody throughout the counseling process by emitting a “raised tone of voice, excited expressions, and nonverbal positive gestures” (Kollar, 2011, p. 97). He needs to be affirmed and not pushed beyond his comfort publicly. I will work hard at leaving teeth marks on my tongue so that I do not dominate him or take charge of his problem. By allowing Brody to speak and express his thoughts and feelings, I will be able to help him change with a solution-focused approach.
Question #4: Mentor Connection
Based upon my mentor’s answer to the Interview Worksheet (2018) and Mentor DISC Assessment (2018) I will shift my relational style to be more compatible with their S/D personality type. My mentor revealed that one of my weaknesses is self-doubt. They feel that my self-doubt lessens my willingness to use my strengths and abilities to their fullest potential resulting in a less effective ministry than could be realized. Another area that my mentor points out that I need improvement in is listening. I need to fight the urge to think of my answer, response and/or story while my mentor is speaking and focus on what they are saying (Jantz, 2018). This can be achieved by following Petersen’s (2015) technique #2 and repeat what the speaker is saying to reassure them that I am listening and reassure myself of what I am hearing. My mentor has a unique personality profile when compared to my own. I tend to allow “those who are willfully stronger to intimidate [me]” (Uniquely You Report, 2018, p. 8). My mentor’s “D” personality reflects a very strong will; however, their “S” personality reflects humble submission. I tend to recognize the strong will and feel intimidated. This results in me seeking to give up leadership and authority to them when their “S” personality really wants me to be the vocal leader.
Conclusion
There are limitless combinations of personalities that I will encounter in my ministry career and in life. A better understanding of how to interpret a person’s disposition, behavior and interactions with others will give me insight as to how I can best communicate with them in a way that is mutually beneficial. Being equipped in this manner, I can be used more fully by God to further His kingdom through healthy communication and relationships. Whether it is office relationships, neighbors, friends, family or counselees, the need to understand the other person to effectively communicate and encourage is central.
Gaining a better understanding of who I am, I am more aware of my strengths and weaknesses in relating to others in a way that will build others up. Being aware of the variety of personalities I will encounter allows me to be more fluid with my own personality when I remember that “God’s intention for us becomes the formative truth regarding personality development, not primarily our understanding and perception of ourselves” (Kollar, 2011, 50). I can find comfort and security in my self-image knowing that God’s intention is shaping me more into the image of Jesus Christ.
References

Carbonell, M. (n.d.). “Uniquely You DISC Assessment. Retrieved from https://uniquelyyou.org/

Carbonell, M. (2008). How to solve the people puzzle: Understanding personality patterns. Blue Ridge, GA: Uniquely You Resources.

Harris, G., & Eikenberry, K. (n.d.). A Free DISC Personality Test: Gain Insights to Build Better, Stronger, More Fulfilling Relationships. Retrieved from https://discpersonalitytesting.com/free-disc-test/

Jantz, E. L. (2018). Mentor’s 360° Interview Worksheet.

Kollar, C. A. (2011). Solution-focused pastoral counseling: An effective short-term approach for getting people back on track (updated and exp. ed.). Grand Rapids, Mich.: Zondervan.

Nichols, K. (2017). Masterpiece: Seeing yourself as God’s work of art changes everything. Lynchburg, VA.: Liberty University Press.

Petersen, J. (2015). Why don’t we listen better? Communicating and connecting in relationships (second ed.). Portland, OR: Petersen Publications.

Rice, D. (2018). A case study on crossroads: A story of forgiveness. Lynchburg, VA.: Liberty University.

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